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Humber Galleries

Education and Media Guides after each of our ongoing exhibitions!

Humber Galleries

We want to learn together! As we move forward into the Winter 2019 semester, Humber Galleries is exploring ways of working together, exchanging ideas, and learning collaboratively in relation to our exhibitions.

Our February exhibition The Breadth of Distance, curated by Alize Zorlutuna across both our North Space and L Space galleries, addresses how elsewheres live in our bodies. Elsewheres are present with us: in familiar scents and flavours, in partial recollections, in the weight of the past.

Bringing together photography, video, installation, and sculpture, these artworks shift across geographies, cultural perspectives, and time. Considering grief, longing, care and resilience, they articulate how relationships to place, representation, and belief shape who we are and how we move in the present.

This exhibition asks us to reckon with how we came to be here on this land. Whether we are Indigenous, multi-generational settlers, or recent immigrants, our current moment demands we think through how we might build mutual understanding and empathy while recognizing our many differences.

The galleries are a place for everyone to learn and experiment through art from our many different perspectives. Art is polytechnic learning: both a way to gain practical skills for many intersecting trades, and a way to think through difficult ideas and possible futures. We welcome the insight and experience of students and faculty from all of Humber College’s programs (and neighbours in our communities, too).

Please reach out to Acting Curator Danica Evering at danica.evering@humber.ca if you're interested in starting a conversation!

Synopsis: The Breadth of Distance

The Breadth of Distance
Amber Williams-King, Charlene Vickers, Chun Hua Catherine Dong, Melisse Watson, Petrina Ng, Soko Fong Negash, Shellie Zhang
Curated by Alize Zorlutuna
February - April 2019

The Breadth of Distance  considers how elsewheres live in our bodies. Spanning vast distances, we carry people and places with us. Elsewheres are present with us: in familiar scents and flavours, in partial recollections, in the weight of the past. Bringing together photography, video, installation, and sculpture, these artworks shift across geographies, cultural perspectives, and time. They consider grief, longing, care, and resilience from many angles. How do our relationships to place shape who we are and how we move in the present?

a map for this place
Amanda Amour-Lynx, Kiera Boult and Delilah Rosier, ​Maddy Court (@xenaworrierprincess), Stefana Fratila, Mz. Icar, Victoria McKenzie and Fabien Maltais-Bayda
Curated by Maddie Alexander and Safia Siad
September - October 2018

a map for this place, curated by Maddie Alexander and Safia Siad across both our North Space and L Space galleries, addresses being different and learning differently within an institution. From many angles, the artists work through mentorship and storytelling, learning or teaching through our bodies, and how to imagine different spaces and structures. Works include a virtual reality video about school, textile works engaging black history and hair, wax bean plants growing out of textbooks full of history badly in need of revising, queer memes, a video piece of dancers unlearning what they have been taught in institutions, an interactive composition sonifying chronic pain and the physio used to work through it, and more. 

Synopsis: Channel 51: Igloolik

Channel 51: Igloolik
Isuma and Arnait Video Productions
Curated by Asinnajaq
January - April 2018

Channel 51: Igloolik is an exhibition of Inuit video art by Isuma and Arnait Video Productions, telling stories and challenging stereotypes about ways of life in the northern provinces of Canada. The exhibit celebrates 30 years of industry-changing video production coming out of Igloolik, a remote community of 1,600 people in Nunavut. A range of topics are covered in the films including but not limited to colonization, climate change, food sovereignty, and resurgence.