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NURS 3052 Virtual Library Workshop: Part 3: Statistics

Crunching Numbers: Exploring Canadian Statistics

Statistics provides important detail on how Canadians are affected by, or relate to, a wide range of health topics.

Data on the health of Canadian citizens includes information on topics such as birth/mortality rates, obesity prevalence, healthy eating and physical activity, and perceived mental and physical health, and much more.

There also exists a wide variety of data and reports on the Canadian health care system, which provides information on wait times, patient access, spending, and the workforce, to name a few.

Statistics Canada and CIHI are outlined below as a good starting point for NURS 3052 assignment research.


Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada (StatsCan) is Canada's central statistical office, which fulfills the Canadian government's responsibility to produce and make available statistics about Canadians. The data collected by StatsCan helps Canadians to better understand life in Canada. The data collected from the national census and other surveys provides information on many aspects of Canadian life, including culture, the economy, and health.

Tip: When reading stats Canada tables and reports, be sure to carefully read any descriptions provided. This information will allow you to better interpret and understand the data.


CIHI (Canadian Institute for Health Information)

CIHI collects and publishes data and reports that particularly focus on the Canadian health care system, including healthcare access, efficiency, spending, and workforce. CIHI also offers data on Canadian determinants of health.


First Nations Information Governance Centre (FNIGC)

Try It!

Research some statistics that address the topic of private vs. public health care in Canada.

Consider:
What types of data could be used to support research on this topic? As an example, how might information about wait times or health care spending support a debate on private versus public health care?