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Personal Support Worker

This guide has been developed to introduce Personal Support Worker students to Humber Libraries' resources and services, and to help with research.

Evaluating Information (CRAAP)

CRAAP Method

Use the CRAAP Test method to determine if a web resource is right for you. Evaluate sources based on the following points:

  • Currency: When was the information published? Is it up to date?
  • Relevance: Is the information what you're really looking for? Who is the material written for: academics, professionals, students, or the general public?
  • Authority: Who published, wrote, or edited the information? Is the author an expert on the topic?
  • Accuracy: Is the information reliable and accurate? Do other sources verify this information?
  • Purpose: What is the purpose of the information? Is it biased to one point of view?

Differences Between Magazine and Journal Articles

Magazine and Journal Articles are often confused. When your instructor asks you to locate a journal article, do you know what you're looking for? The table below outlines some key differences between both sources of information.
 
  Magazine Article Journal Article
Topic General or current interest Detailed examination of professional interest
Author


Non-professional journalist or freelancewriter

Professional, topical expert
(qualifications required)
Purpose To inform or entertain To keep scholars current with new research
Audience General public    Professional or special interest groups
Example Maclean's Nursing Science Quarterly

Peer Reviewed Documents

Peer reviewed articles have undergone a process of evaluation by subject specific experts (peers) to ensure that information is accurate, high quality, and academically sound. Peer reviewed articles contain original research to be shared with researchers and other professionals.

Not all articles are peer reviewed. To find peer reviewed articles:

  • Look for a "Peer Review" or "refereed" search limiter when conducting your search (see example below)
  • Check the website of the publication your article was published in. Most journals will state whether the articles within are peer reviewed.